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Classicalfan626

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Classicalfan626 last won the day on September 6 2020

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  1. Introduction This is a revision of the United States presidential election of 1964, the year of Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson's landslide election against Republican Barry Goldwater. In the 1964 election of the current timeline, Johnson received over 61% of the popular vote compared to over 38% for Goldwater. But in this revised version of history, the 1964 landslide is a bit narrower. In this revision, Johnson has 58.4% of the popular vote compared to Goldwater's 41.2%, for a victory margin of just over 17%. I'm doing this because Barry Goldwater is a significant pioneer figure in the patriotic American revolution, known by the mainstream as the American conservative movement. Ronald Reagan admired Goldwater, and his political beliefs in many ways mirrored that of Goldwater. With 41% of the popular vote instead of 38%, this further paves the way for the Reagan landslides, which will be much bigger than the ones in the current timeline by the way. The revised election below is organized state-by-state in alphabetical order, for a total of 50 states plus the District of Columbia. United States presidential election, 1964 (results estimated) Alabama Barry Goldwater (R): 500,785 (72.5%) Other: 190,033 (27.5%) Total: 690,818 Alaska Lyndon B. Johnson (D): 42,329 (62%) Goldwater: 25,930 (38%) Total: 68,259 Arizona Goldwater: 258,035 (53.6%) Johnson: 223,253 (46.3%) Other: 482 (0.1%) Total: 481,770 Arkansas Johnson: 297,697 (53%) Goldwater: 260,764 (46.4%) Other: 2,965 (0.5%) Total: 561,426 California Johnson: 4,008,877 (56.6%) Goldwater: 3,068,108 (43.3%) Other: 6,601 (0.1%) Total: 7,083,586 Colorado Johnson: 452,024 (58.1%) Goldwater: 321,767 (41.4%) Other: 4,195 (0.5%) Total: 777,986 Connecticut Johnson: 787,269 (64.6%) Goldwater: 430,996 (35.3%) Other: 1,313 (0.1%) Total: 1,219,578 Delaware Johnson: 117,204 (57.9%) Goldwater: 84,578 (41.8%) Other: 538 (0.3%) Total: 202,320 District of Columbia Johnson: 169,796 (85.1%) Goldwater: 29,801 (14.9%) Total: 199,597 Florida Johnson: 948,540 (51.1%) Goldwater: 906,941 (48.9%) Total: 1,855,481 Georgia Goldwater: 653,584 (57.3%) Johnson: 486,556 (42.7%) Other: 195 (0.0%) Total: 1,140,335 Hawaii Johnson: 159,249 (76.5%) Goldwater: 49,022 (23.5%) Total: 208,271 Idaho Johnson: 148,920 (50.7%) Goldwater: 144,557 (49.3%) Total: 293,477 Illinois Johnson: 2,703,833 (57.5%) Goldwater: 1,999,946 (42.5%) Other: 62 (0.0%) Total: 4,703,841 Indiana Johnson: 1,118,848 (53.5%) Goldwater: 964,118 (46.1%) Other: 9,640 (0.5%) Total: 2,092,606 Iowa Johnson: 698,030 (58.9%) Goldwater: 485,148 (40.9%) Other: 2,361 (0.2%) Total: 1,185,539 Kansas Johnson: 437,028 (50.9%) Goldwater: 414,579 (48.3%) Other: 7,294 (0.8%) Total: 858,901 Kentucky Johnson: 637,659 (60.9%) Goldwater: 405,977 (38.8%) Other: 3,469 (0.3%) Total: 1,047,105 Louisiana Goldwater: 537,225 (59.9%) Johnson: 360,068 (40.1%) Total: 897,293 Maine Johnson: 251,264 (65.8%) Goldwater: 130,701 (34.2%) Total: 381,965 Maryland Johnson: 697,912 (62.5%) Goldwater: 419,495 (37.5%) Other: 50 (0.0%) Total: 1,117,457 Massachusetts Johnson: 1,740,422 (74.2%) Goldwater: 596,727 (25.4%) Other: 8,649 (0.4%) Total: 2,345,798 Michigan Johnson: 2,040,445 (63.7%) Goldwater: 1,157,322 (36.1%) Other: 6,335 (0.2%) Total: 3,204,102 Minnesota Johnson: 943,117 (60.6%) Goldwater: 608,624 (39.1%) Other: 3,721 (0.2%) Total: 1,555,462 Mississippi Goldwater: 357,528 (87.2%) Johnson: 52,618 (12.8%) Total: 410,146 Missouri Johnson: 1,090,236 (59.9%) Goldwater: 728,643 (40.1%) Total: 1,818,879 Montana Johnson: 155,746 (55.7%) Goldwater: 122,532 (43.8%) Other: 1,350 (0.5%) Total: 279,628 Nebraska Johnson: 301,307 (51.5%) Goldwater: 283,847 (48.5%) Total: 585,154 Nevada Johnson: 75,839 (55.6%) Goldwater: 60,594 (44.4%) Total: 136,433 New Hampshire Johnson: 173,167 (59.9%) Goldwater: 115,926 (40.1%) Total: 289,093 New Jersey Johnson: 1,760,231 (61.8%) Goldwater: 1,073,174 (37.7%) Other: 15,258 (0.5%) Total: 2,848,663 New Mexico Johnson: 185,015 (56.1%) Goldwater: 142,838 (43.3%) Other: 1,792 (0.5%) Total: 329,645 New York Johnson: 4,748,102 (66%) Goldwater: 2,434,559 (33.8%) Other: 9,614 (0.1%) Total: 7,192,275 North Carolina Johnson: 761,139 (53.4%) Goldwater: 664,844 (46.6%) Total: 1,425,983 North Dakota Johnson: 140,784 (54.3%) Goldwater: 118,207 (45.6%) Other: 398 (0.2%) Total: 259,389 Ohio Johnson: 2,378,545 (59.9%) Goldwater: 1,591,651 (40.1%) Total: 3,970,196 Oklahoma Johnson: 489,834 (52.5%) Goldwater: 443,665 (47.5%) Total: 933,499 Oregon Johnson: 477,017 (60.6%) Goldwater: 307,779 (39.1%) Other: 2,509 (0.3%) Total: 787,305 Pennsylvania Johnson: 2,981,774 (61.8%) Goldwater: 1,823,837 (37.8%) Other: 18,079 (0.4%) Total: 4,823,690 Rhode Island Johnson: 307,463 (78.6%) Goldwater: 83,615 (21.4%) Other: 13 (0.0%) Total: 391,091 South Carolina Goldwater: 325,048 (61.8%) Johnson: 200,723 (38.2%) Other: 8 (0.0%) Total: 525,779 South Dakota Johnson: 154,010 (52.4%) Goldwater: 140,108 (47.6%) Total: 294,118 Tennessee Johnson: 598,947 (52.3%) Goldwater: 545,965 (47.7%) Other: 34 (0.0%) Total: 1,144,946 Texas Johnson: 1,634,185 (62.2%) Goldwater: 988,566 (37.6%) Other: 5,060 (0.2%) Total: 2,627,811 Utah Johnson: 207,628 (51.6%) Goldwater: 194,785 (48.4%) Total: 402,413 Vermont Johnson: 105,127 (64.1%) Goldwater: 58,942 (35.9%) Other: 20 (0.0%) Total: 164,089 Virginia Johnson: 548,038 (52.5%) Goldwater: 492,334 (47.2%) Other: 2,895 (0.3%) Total: 1,043,267 Washington Johnson: 740,881 (58.8%) Goldwater: 510,366 (40.5%) Other: 8,309 (0.7%) Total: 1,259,556 West Virginia Johnson: 506,118 (63.8%) Goldwater: 286,922 (36.2%) Total: 793,040 Wisconsin Johnson: 982,492 (58%) Goldwater: 707,427 (41.8%) Other: 2,896 (0.2%) Total: 1,692,815 Wyoming Johnson: 75,278 (52.4%) Goldwater: 68,438 (47.6%) Total: 143,716 United States (total) Johnson: 41,302,584 (58.4%) Goldwater: 29,126,870 (41.2%) Other: 316,138 (0.4%) Total: 70,745,592
  2. I cannot off the top of my head, but there are too many anomalies that have occurred since January 6th. I'd bet my life savings that you cannot know for sure that all of those things are actually BS, and to think that stuff posted on Facebook and Twitter (for instance) are any more trustworthy I think would be insane. In another instance, I think it would be equally insane to believe all that left-wing propaganda from the mainstream media has any more factual validity than the stuff posted on Parler. You may believe whatever outlandish and crazy doomsday things you'd like, but don't try to convince me it's real. I have just stated my opinion. I think I'm gonna go ahead and lock this thread, because it has gotten so far off-topic.
  3. @KerrTexas - I was just assuming you were because from the sources I'm aware of, including Charlie Ward and Simon Parkes (both of which can be found on Bit Chute), I believe that at least some of what you're saying is clearly not the case. Ask yourself this: Why would Trump let the Left get away with stealing the election from him after he's done so much to help the U.S. and the rest of the world? It just doesn't make any sense. I'm curious to know where you get your sources, and not something that was published decades ago like the book you provided a link for.
  4. Yes, and no. There's a dual presidency in the US. Biden (or whoever is his double or clone) is in charge of some specific administrative policies, while Trump is in charge of the military, law enforcement, and some other things. That's what I understand.
  5. @KerrTexas & @PaulaJedi - I actually think Trump is still worthy of trust. I strongly believe that he did sign the Insurrection Act. Think about all the repercussions that would be facing Trump had he made his signing of the act public! My fellow patriots, stop watching political videos on YouTube, as the site suppresses real information and deletes videos that are not in line with the left-wing agenda. Big tech is communist!!
  6. Unfortunately, I don't know of one yet. I'm pretty sure Trump did it in secret, anyway.
  7. I agree with you on some of your points, and also understand where you're coming from. But also be aware that what you're seeing in the media is all pantomime, and the "conspiracy theorists" are closer to the truth than anyone else. According to these true investigative journalists (AKA the "conspiracy theorists"), President Trump signed the Insurrection Act before leaving DC. That means the "new administration" is actually the U.S. military. While the price of gasoline and cost of living may be going up, this is all a charade and might only be temporary.
  8. I'm not 100% sure either. But I haven't had too much to talk about lately, and I've been quite occupied and busy. I'd assume the same is true with other TTI members.
  9. Introduction The following paragraphs show a rough idea of a 2nd proposed change in history, the 1st one being about physically/genetically equating cat and dog years with human years, going back thousands or a million or more years. To take a look at the 1st change, go to this article. The 2nd one here is about modern Judaism, going back as early as the 6th century, roughly between 500 and 599 CE. Simon of Rome (500-551 CE) The modern history of Judaism among Eastern Slavic peoples begins in the 6th century with the reforms from Simon of Rome. Simon was born January 1, 500 into a close-knit Jewish community in Rome. He grew up just as any normal Jew at that time would. However, Simon’s mother (483-514) died when he was 14, and his father (480-515) died when Simon was 15. He then opened to the outside world where things were much different. He learned to understand, read, write, and speak medieval Italian dialects fluently. What he found perplexing was that the people there considered their nationality as Roman and their faith as Christian. He had always identified himself as Jewish, not Roman, and did not even know the word “religion.” Over a period of trial and error, he concluded that his nationality was Roman and that his religion was Jewish. Simon was known to have a photographic memory. He became ordained as a rabbi at age 20 and rose to become the head rabbi of his community by age 22. Outside his synagogue three years later, Simon announced to his congregation his four-fold reforms. First, he would have his people come in contact with the outside world, where the Roman Italians were Christians. Second, he would have his people assimilate into Roman Italian culture (i.e. adopting Latin names, Italian dress, and especially Roman nationality); thus, Simon adopted the Latin equivalent of his name, Semeonus. Third, he would nullify certain Jewish laws, including numerous “commandments,” especially dietary laws. He believed that too many commandments were overabundant (And the commandments he would later emphasize would be reduced to the ten now known as the Ten Commandments). This reform permitted Jews to eat foods that were formerly forbidden to them due to old kosher “laws”, such as pork and shellfish. Simon believed that the dietary restrictions were not essential and considered them null and void. Also for the first time, they were allowed to eat meat with dairy products like cheese. Essentially, anything generally considered edible or “good eats” was now kosher. Fourth, Simon proclaimed that it was the duty of the Jews to seek the conversion of as much Roman Italians as possible to Judaism. He reinterpreted the meaning of “God’s chosen people” to mean both that Jews were God’s treasured people, and that they were chosen to spread their morals through proselytizing. Although Simon’s reforms were far-reaching, he still had his people maintain core practices such as circumcision and observance of Jewish holidays. Despite the apparent shock of these announcements, his congregation remained as connected to him as they were before Simon announced his reforms. They followed all that Simon said. After his successful attempts within one year to convert 2% of Italians in Rome to Judaism, the Pope issued a decree banning further Jewish missionary activity in order to keep Rome predominantly Christian. Following this, Simon and his fellow Jews, including some Roman Italian converts, decided to move far away from Rome. They did this promptly, traveling progressively east until they reached what is now western Russia. There, they met Eastern Slavic peoples who welcomed them into their territory. In return for the Jews adopting Eastern Slavic culture, which included growing long beards at that time, 25% of all Eastern Slavs converted, within a period of ten years, from their native pagan religion to Judaism. Simon settled and remained living near what is now Smolensk, Russia until he died of a blood infection, on August 28, 551, at the age of 51. Recent studies have shown that he probably had Asperger’s Syndrome, a slight form of autism. Legacy of Simon The massive number of Eastern Slavic converts to Judaism contributed to Eastern Slavic nations’ religious tolerance and their rich Jewish heritage that they have maintained to the present day, excluding the Soviet era. A few centuries later, when Vladimir, prince of Kiev, converted to Orthodox Christianity, he had most people living in Kievan Rus’ converted as well. While virtually all pagans converted to Christianity, only one fifth (5%) of Eastern Slavic Jews converted with them. The rest of the Jews remained with Judaism. This left the Eastern Slavs 75% Orthodox Christian, 20% Jewish, and 5% other faiths. After Vladimir’s death, many Eastern Slavic Jews became missionaries and subsequently gained many more Eastern Slavic converts to Judaism. The Mongols invaded and conquered Kievan Rus’ in the early 13th century. By that time, about 30% of all ethnic Russians, Ukrainians, and Belarusians were practicing Judaism (about 65% were practicing Orthodox Christianity), but the process of seeking converts came to a virtual halt. The Mongol Invasion had also cut off contact with the West until Ivan Petrov brought the Renaissance to Russia. (Ivan Petrov will be elaborated on in a future article.) Prior to the coming of the Renaissance, Russians were unaware that Jews had been expelled from England in 1290. By 1400, the Renaissance had come into full swing throughout Europe and the Mongols had been ousted from Russia. The Russian discovery of Jewish expulsion from England and the spirit of the Renaissance prompted many of Russia’s Jewish missionaries to seek converts to Judaism throughout Europe. As a result, approximately 15% of gentiles in each European region or nation outside Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus converted to Judaism. The subsequent persecutions of converts to Judaism in England helped inspire even more English people to convert to Judaism, resulting in the policy of a virtual religious tolerance in England. Jews in exile were welcomed back. This policy of religious tolerance swept throughout Europe. However, Roman Catholic Church officials tried to intervene and frequently spent time devising tribunals against people accused of heresy, such as the Holy Inquisition in Italy, which didn’t affect Jews, as they were considered a completely different religious group. From the time Simon of Rome died in 551 to the early Renaissance, Jews throughout Europe, especially Russia, were granted titles of nobility. To this day, most Jews in Western countries have been of ethnic European descent. For instance, most Jews in Russia are of ethnic Russian descent, and most Jews in Germany are of ethnic German descent. Also, virtually all European Jews have adopted secular names, such as Vladimir in Russia and Heinrich in Germany. Both are the legacy of the sought conversions to Judaism from Simon of Rome and his followers. However, two-thirds of Russian-American Jews belong to a group called Ashkenazim, while one-third do not belong to Ashkenazim and are of ethnic Russian descent. Back in the late 1800s and early 1900s in Russia, non-Slavs, especially Ashkenazic Jews, who refused to adopt Russian given names and sometimes Russian surnames, in place of Jewish given names and Ashkenazic Jewish surnames, were subject to “Russification.” This was a nationalistic process instituted by the czars ensuring that citizens of the Russian Empire would accept the Russian language as their language and their nationality to be Russian as well. The czars forbade given names alien to them and insisted on those of Slavic origin. These policies were especially enforced upon Ashkenazic Jews, and if they refused to follow the policies, they were unofficially persecuted in pogroms. The ancestors of American Jews of Ashkenazic-Russian descent fled Russia to the United States to escape these pogroms, while American Jews of ethnic Russian descent fled Russia to the United States because they considered Ashkenazic-Russian Jews who fled there to be linked to them like a spiritual family, a concept essential to all practicing Jews. Likewise, American Jews of Ashkenazic-Russian descent have an Ashkenazic Jewish heritage, while American Jews of ethnic Russian descent have a Russian heritage. Thus, both Russian Orthodox Christians and ethnic-Russian Jews share many characteristics. Ethnic-Russian Jews have maintained virtually all Russian cuisine (with the exception of foods related to Christian holidays such as Christmas and Easter) of their gentile ancestors, but since the early Renaissance have absorbed the cuisine of Ashkenazic Jews migrating to Russia at that time. Before long Russia’s Orthodox Christians absorbed Ashkenazic cuisine as well. For instance, bagels and bialys have been a few of the common staples in a Russian breakfast, and knishes and potato and cheese blintzes have served as a Russian lunch for centuries. Fruit-filled blintzes, such as those filled with apples, cherries, or blueberries, have become common desserts in Russian cuisine. Appeal to Judaism in Rest of Europe Prior to the entry of eastern Slavic Jewish missionaries from Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus into the rest of Europe, especially where the dominant religion was Roman Catholicism, Roman Catholics were not allowed to eat meat on Fridays throughout the entire year. The Jewish missionaries entered Roman Catholic Europe beginning around 1400. Eastern Slavic Judaism appealed to many people in Roman Catholic Europe, partly because there were no dietary restrictions in this form of Judaism, with the exception of Passover, the Jewish holiday in which eating leavened bread was forbidden. (Also, this form of Judaism maintained holidays where fasting was mandatory.) As a result, early in 1407, to serve as a counter-revolution to the increasing popularity of Judaism in Europe, the Roman Catholic Church lifted the ban on eating meat on Fridays, with the exception of Lent, the only period throughout the year where the ban was maintained. One result of the official 1407 proclamation would be as follows: Friday is considered a major pizza day for dinner, so since the late 1800s, with a mass wave of Italian immigration to the US, expect at least some Italian-American families in cities like New York to indulge in pizza with meat toppings on Fridays outside of the Lenten period, especially pepperoni, sausage, meatball, ham, prosciutto, salami, bacon, and/or pancetta.
  10. It seems to me that whoever wrote those articles has no physical evidence to back up his statements that time isn't a dimension, or that time travel, tachyons, etc. aren't real. There's a saying that goes, "Where there's a will, there's a way". Assuming that's true, denials of the existence of such concepts are full of utter bullshit. The average human mind, even the average scientific one, has a lot of learning to do. Have you ever heard of the Philadelphia Experiment, the Nazi Bell, or the theory that some "ETs" we see may be time travelers from the future?
  11. Introduction This is a revision of the United States presidential election of 1956, the year of Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower's landslide reelection. The previous presidential election, the one in 1952, was also a landslide for President Eisenhower. Eisenhower received 55.2% of the popular vote that year to Democrat Adlai Stevenson's 44.3%, and I intend to keep these totals somewhat similar to that of the current timeline/version of history. In other words, the 1952 election will be virtually unchanged. In the 1956 election of the current timeline, a rematch between Eisenhower and Stevenson, it was a slightly bigger landslide of over 15 percentage points compared the nearly 11-point margin of 1952. But in this revised version of history, the 1956 election has a much larger margin of victory in favor of Eisenhower. Eisenhower has 62.7% of the popular vote compared to Stevenson's 36.9%, and this results in a margin of nearly 26 percentage points! I figured I'd do this since the 1950s was a very patriotic era in U.S. history, as it came in the aftermath of World War II. Also, Eisenhower was one of the most popular American presidents of the mid-20th century. The revised election below is organized state-by-state in alphabetical order, for a total of 48 states; this takes place before Alaska and Hawaii are annexed and the District of Columbia is included in presidential elections. United States presidential election, 1956 (results estimated) Alabama Adlai Stevenson (D): 272,262 (54.8%) Dwight D. Eisenhower (R): 214,542 (43.2%) Other: 10,167 (2%) Total: 496,971 Arizona Eisenhower: 193,061 (66.5%) Stevenson: 96,909 (33.4%) Other: 303 (0.1%) Total: 290,273 Arkansas Eisenhower: 210,493 (51.8%) Stevenson: 192,675 (47.4%) Other: 3,504 (0.9%) Total: 406,672 California Eisenhower: 3,493,640 (63.9%) Stevenson: 1,955,163 (35.8%) Other: 18,552 (0.3%) Total: 5,467,355 Colorado Eisenhower: 447,642 (67.5%) Stevenson: 210,934 (31.8%) Other: 4,598 (0.7%) Total: 663,174 Connecticut Eisenhower: 712,564 (63.8%) Stevenson: 404,452 (36.2%) Other: 205 (0.0%) Total: 1,117,221 Delaware Eisenhower: 106,621 (59.9%) Stevenson: 70,957 (39.8%) Other: 510 (0.3%) Total: 178,088 Florida Eisenhower: 708,546 (63%) Stevenson: 415,774 (37%) Total: 1,124,320 Georgia Stevenson: 402,965 (60.7%) Eisenhower: 254,881 (38.4%) Other: 5,734 (0.9%) Total: 663,580 Idaho Eisenhower: 197,798 (72.4%) Stevenson: 75,149 (27.5%) Other: 142 (0.1%) Total: 273,089 Illinois Eisenhower: 2,777,611 (63%) Stevenson: 1,621,498 (36.8%) Other: 8,398 (0.2%) Total: 4,407,507 Indiana Eisenhower: 1,306,269 (66.2%) Stevenson: 660,550 (33.5%) Other: 7,888 (0.4%) Total: 1,974,707 Iowa Eisenhower: 812,656 (65.8%) Stevenson: 418,489 (33.9%) Other: 3,519 (0.3%) Total: 1,234,664 Kansas Eisenhower: 623,247 (71.9%) Stevenson: 240,048 (27.7%) Other: 3,048 (0.4%) Total: 866,343 Kentucky Eisenhower: 611,792 (58.1%) Stevenson: 436,953 (41.5%) Other: 5,160 (0.5%) Total: 1,053,905 Louisiana Eisenhower: 340,754 (55.2%) Stevenson: 254,630 (41.2%) Other: 22,260 (3.6%) Total: 617,644 Maine Eisenhower: 249,606 (70.9%) Stevenson: 102,200 (29.1%) Total: 351,806 Maryland Eisenhower: 592,479 (63.5%) Stevenson: 339,972 (36.5%) Total: 932,451 Massachusetts Eisenhower: 1,463,651 (62.3%) Stevenson: 877,836 (37.4%) Other: 7,119 (0.3%) Total: 2,348,606 Michigan Eisenhower: 1,960,165 (63.6%) Stevenson: 1,113,480 (36.1%) Other: 6,923 (0.2%) Total: 3,080,568 Minnesota Eisenhower: 769,622 (57.4%) Stevenson: 567,305 (42.3%) Other: 3,178 (0.2%) Total: 1,340,105 Mississippi Stevenson: 119,018 (47.9%) Eisenhower: 118,489 (47.7%) Other: 10,742 (4.3%) Total: 248,249 Missouri Eisenhower: 1,079,255 (58.9%) Stevenson: 753,407 (41.1%) Total: 1,832,662 Montana Eisenhower: 180,124 (66.4%) Stevenson: 91,147 (33.6%) Total: 271,271 Nebraska Eisenhower: 428,714 (74.3%) Stevenson: 148,523 (25.7%) Total: 577,237 Nevada Eisenhower: 65,342 (67.5%) Stevenson: 31,447 (32.5%) Total: 96,789 New Hampshire Eisenhower: 181,971 (68.1%) Stevenson: 85,012 (31.8%) Other: 111 (0.0%) Total: 267,094 New Jersey Eisenhower: 1,634,991 (65.8%) Stevenson: 822,388 (33.1%) Other: 27,033 (1.1%) Total: 2,484,412 New Mexico Eisenhower: 158,309 (62.3%) Stevenson: 94,677 (37.3%) Other: 1,040 (0.4%) Total: 254,026 New York Eisenhower: 4,447,440 (62.7%) Stevenson: 2,644,669 (37.3%) Other: 2,227 (0.0%) Total: 7,094,336 North Carolina Eisenhower: 633,437 (54.3%) Stevenson: 532,255 (45.7%) Total: 1,165,692 North Dakota Eisenhower: 182,920 (72%) Stevenson: 70,688 (27.8%) Other: 483 (0.2%) Total: 254,091 Ohio Eisenhower: 2,401,724 (64.9%) Stevenson: 1,300,641 (35.1%) Total: 3,702,365 Oklahoma Eisenhower: 538,359 (62.6%) Stevenson: 321,091 (37.4%) Total: 859,450 Oregon Eisenhower: 454,293 (61.8%) Stevenson: 281,404 (38.2%) Total: 735,697 Pennsylvania Eisenhower: 2,928,110 (64%) Stevenson: 1,639,011 (35.8%) Other: 9,482 (0.2%) Total: 4,576,603 Rhode Island Eisenhower: 228,827 (59%) Stevenson: 158,882 (41%) Other: 2 (0.0%) Total: 387,711 South Carolina Eisenhower: 172,893 (57.5%) Stevenson: 105,662 (35.1%) Other: 22,128 (7.4%) Total: 300,683 South Dakota Eisenhower: 206,946 (70.4%) Stevenson: 87,011 (29.6%) Total: 293,957 Tennessee Eisenhower: 545,006 (58%) Stevenson: 384,193 (40.9%) Other: 10,305 (1.1%) Total: 939,504 Texas Eisenhower: 1,198,028 (61.3%) Stevenson: 742,649 (38%) Other: 14,968 (0.8%) Total: 1,955,645 Utah Eisenhower: 224,078 (67.1%) Stevenson: 110,017 (32.9%) Total: 334,095 Vermont Eisenhower: 110,614 (72.3%) Stevenson: 42,425 (27.7%) Other: 39 (0.0%) Total: 153,078 Virginia Eisenhower: 449,841 (64.4%) Stevenson: 226,357 (32.4%) Other: 21,880 (3.1%) Total: 698,078 Washington Eisenhower: 718,332 (62.4%) Stevenson: 425,200 (36.9%) Other: 7,457 (0.6%) Total: 1,150,989 West Virginia Eisenhower: 468,063 (56.3%) Stevenson: 362,868 (43.7%) Total: 830,931 Wisconsin Eisenhower: 1,024,675 (66.1%) Stevenson: 517,037 (33.3%) Other: 8,946 (0.6%) Total: 1,550,658 Wyoming Eisenhower: 88,027 (70.9%) Stevenson: 36,200 (29.1%) Total: 124,227 United States (total) Eisenhower: 38,916,448 (62.7%) Stevenson: 22,864,080 (36.9%) Other: 248,051 (0.4%) Total: 62,028,579
  12. Introduction I've had a few relatives in my family, including both my grandfathers and my paternal grandmother, who smoked cigarettes a lot longer than they should have, and though they did quit smoking, they paid for their smoking since their lives ended somewhat prematurely as a complication of what they did all those years. With that in mind, I've come up with the idea of having alternatives to smoking tobacco come out as early as 1950. This is a revised, abridged history of the vaporizer (vape), AKA electronic cigarette. Background In the aftermath of World War II, which ended in 1945, New York City engineer John Joseph Flanders (May 4, 1905 - August 10, 2008) worked on a study (following a similar one made in Spain by Madrid physicians and brothers Antonio (1900-2000) and Ramon Hernandez (1902-1998), published in August 1946; Flanders read an English translation of this study) indicating that smoking tobacco led to a variety of illnesses, including cancer and heart disease. The Flanders study was published in September 1947, and was even more widely read as the Hernandez study. The following year, Flanders began his work on the invention of the vape, and founded NVC (the National Vaporizer Corporation), the first manufacturer of the vape and vape juices. More Vape History The vape was in development between 1948 and 1950. The process included the development of vape juices as well as the vape itself. The invention of the vape was finished in 1950 by John Flanders and his associates. NVC released the invention to retail stores nationwide on September 5 of that year. The first 15 flavors of vape juice, which also became available in retail stores on September 5, 1950, were strawberry, raspberry, cherry, orange, lemon, lime, blueberry, grape, peppermint, vanilla, chocolate, cola, bubblegum, cotton candy, and licorice. Due to the mainstream popularity and success of the vape, 20 additional flavors were added to the vape juice line in 1952, and were released into retail stores on September 2, bringing the total number of flavors to 35 thus far. The 20 new flavors were apple, peach, banana, pear, blackberry, plum, apricot, pineapple, grapefruit, watermelon, mango, coconut, cinnamon, cream soda, ginger ale, marshmallow, coffee, caramel, tangerine, and fruit punch. 15 additional flavors were added in 1954, released into retail stores on September 7, bringing the new total to 50. 25 additional flavors were added in 1959, released into retail stores on September 8, bringing the new total to 75. Another 25 additional flavors were added in 1964, released into retail stores on September 8, bringing the new total to 100. The list of vape juice flavors has continued expanding up to the present day.
  13. Introduction This is a complete list of the 10 symphonies by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1833), the 10th and final of which is currently theoretical and should become a reality in either an alternate timeline or a revision of history as we know it. The symphonies notes' contain the numerical order of each symphony, the key of each symphony and each of their movements, the numerical order of symphony movements (indicated in lowercase Roman numerals), the years of composition in parentheses, and the forms of each symphony movement (i.e. sonata form, rondo, etc.) also included in parentheses. In regards to musicologists and classical music specialists who may be reading this, please also note that the year 1833, displayed as the year of Beethoven's death, is no mistake, but a deliberate revision of Beethoven's death year of 1827 in current history. This is explained in the Notes section at the end of my list of German composers. That list can be found here. The 10 Symphonies 1. Symphony No. 1 in C major (1800) -i. C major (sonata form) -ii. F major (sonata form) -iii. C major (minuet/trio) -iv. C major (sonata form) 2. Symphony No. 2 in D major (1802) -i. D major (sonata form) -ii. A major (sonata form) -iii. D major (scherzo/trio) -iv. D major (sonata form) 3. Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, "Eroica" (1804) -i. E-flat major (sonata form) -ii. C minor (rondo) -iii. E-flat major (scherzo) -iv. E-flat major (theme & variations) 4. Symphony No. 4 in B-flat major (1806) -i. B-flat major (sonata form) -ii. E-flat major (theme & variations) -iii. B-flat major (scherzo) -iv. B-flat major (sonata form) 5. Symphony No. 5 in C minor (1808) -i. C minor (sonata form) -ii. A-flat major (theme & variations) -iii. C minor (scherzo; ends in passage leading to finale) -iv. C major (sonata form) 6. Symphony No. 6 in F major, "Pastoral" (1808) -i. F major (sonata form) -ii. B-flat major (sonata form) -iii. F major (scherzo; ends introducing next mvt.) -iv. F minor (? form; ends in passage leading to finale) -v. F major (sonata (?) form) 7. Symphony No. 7 in A major (1812) -i. A major (sonata form) -ii. A minor (rondo (?) -iii. F major (scherzo) -iv. A major (sonata rondo (?) form) 8. Symphony No. 8 in F major (1812) -i. F major (sonata form) -ii. B-flat major (sonata form) -iii. F major (ternary; tempo of minuet) -iv. F major (sonata form) 9. Symphony No. 9 in D minor, "Choral" (1824) -i. D minor (sonata form) -ii. D minor (scherzo; ends in D major) -iii. B-flat major (theme & variations) -iv. D major (variety of forms; begins in D minor) 10. Symphony No. 10 in C minor (1830) -i. C minor (sonata form; ends in C major) -ii. A-flat major (theme & variations) -iii. C minor (scherzo) -iv. E-flat major (ternary form; ends in passage leading to finale) -v. C major (sonata form)
  14. Introduction This is a list of American classical composers, both real and fictional. The fictional ones are intended to become a reality in a separate timeline or in revised history. However, the names of these composers inserted into this list are largely hypothetical. That is, they may or may not be named as such after history is changed. The names of these composers are highlighted in boldface. The purpose of the presence of these composers is to make more compositional geniuses out of the people of America. European countries, particularly Italy, Spain, France, Germany, Austria, England, and Russia are to be abundant in genius composers since the Renaissance, and America since the Baroque era. These 8 nations are the nucleus of Western classical music and composition, and thus these are the nationalities I choose to focus on. List Baroque (c1615-c1760) John Whipple (b. England) (1592 – 1673) Thomas Young (b. England) (1594 – 1652) James Waller (b. England) (1597 – 1674) Charles Greenley (b. England) (1602 – 1681) Arthur Wagstaff (b. England) (1604 – 1673) Andreas Vanderheyden (b. Netherlands) (1607 – 1680) Francis Hitch (b. England) (1610 – 1672) John Dunworth (b. England) (1613 – 1693) William Oldham (b. England) (1616 – 1682) James Middleton (1620 – 1688) James Haycock (1626 – 1696) Benjamin Withers (1627 – 1698) Solomon Barley (1633 – 1706) Josiah Faucett (1634 – 1697) Timothy Maxfield (1636 – 1703) Abraham Wright (1640 – 1714) Francis Honeywell (1642 – 1708) Jacob Turner (1646 – 1718) Benjamin Morrow (1651 – 1706) Christopher Ingalls (1653 – 1703) Nathaniel Pierpont (1657 – 1736) Jeremy Chandler (1660 – 1740) Malachi Langston (1664 – 1747) Samuel Teasley (1667 – 1733) Benjamin Dixon (1671 – 1748) George Henshaw (1674 – 1758) James Edgecomb (1677 – 1738) Thomas Mankin (1681 – 1764) Martin Jenner (1683 – 1727) John Holyfield (1684 – 1753) William Blackwell (1688 – 1759) Charles Theodore Pachelbel (b. Germany) (1690 – 1750) Charles Merrill (1694 – 1767) John Northcott (1699 – 1779) Samuel Mumford (1703 – 1770) Henry Judson (1705 – 1777) Josiah Dodrill (1708 – 1784) Christopher Fairfax (1712 – 1781) Classical era (c1730-c1820) John Stebbins (1715 – 1792) Michael Broadbent (1717 – 1787) Charles Hastings (1722 – 1784) George Warren (1724 – 1806) Andrew Dorsett (1727 – 1793) Francis Dayton (1732 – 1797) Francis Hyland (1735 – 1813) Nicholas Atherton (1737 – 1811) John Antes (1740 – 1811) William Hardrick (1744 – 1819) William Billings (1746 – 1800) Thomas Stubblefield (1751 – 1813) Edward Sealock (1754 – 1823) George Farlow (1757 – 1794) Henry Hazelton (1762 – 1831) Robert Selleck (1764 – 1831) Daniel Wormwood (1766 – 1826) James Hewitt (1770 – 1827) Romantic (c1800-c1910) William Sharpe (1772 – 1846) Charles Langdon (1776 – 1850) Thomas Blake (1781 – 1842) John Stickney (1783 – 1867) Robert Alldredge (1786 – 1867) Lowell Mason (1792 – 1872) Frederick Leaman (1794 – 1843) John Nicholson (1797 – 1868) Vincent Hyde (1801 – 1847) Hiram Rufus (1803 – 1876) Robert Fennell (1808 – 1896) Richard Dolby (1810 – 1861) William Henry Fry (1813 – 1864) Alexander Peniston (1817 – 1886) George Frederick Bristow (1825 – 1898) Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) William Mason (1829 – 1908) Henry Litchfield (1832 – 1898) Charles Burbank (1835 – 1905) John Knowles Paine (1839 – 1906) George Nickerson (1840 – 1912) Horatio Crocker (1843 – 1918) John Mashburn (1847 – 1924) George Ingersoll (1851 – 1933) George Whitefield Chadwick (1854–1931) Victor Herbert (1859–1924) Edward MacDowell (1860–1908) Charles Martin Loeffler (b. Alsace) (1861–1935) Horatio Parker (1863–1919) Modern and Contemporary (c1880-????) Harry Wayne Lawley (1863 – 1939) Benjamin Cherry (1866 – 1941) Patrick Sullivan (b. Ireland) (1870 – 1947) Henry Jaeger (1871 – 1952) Joseph (Giuseppe) Moffa (b. Italy) (1871 – 1955) Joseph Daley (1872 – 1956) Francis (Franciszek) Traczyk (b. Poland) (1872 – 1958) Reuben Friedman (b. Austria) (1873 – 1988) Charles Ives (1874–1954) Stephen Reinhardt (1874 – 1970) John Alden Carpenter (1876–1951) Carl Ruggles (1876–1971) Francis (Francesco) Biviano (b. Italy) (1877 – 1979) Henry Kaplan (b. Russia) (1878 – 1988) Ernest Bloch (b. Switzerland) (1880–1959) Charles Wakefield Cadman (1881–1946) Roy Jacob Cooper (1881 – 1957) Max Mandel (b. Russia) (1881 – 1990) Charles Tomlinson Griffes (1884–1920) Deems Taylor (1885–1966) Henry Sokoloff (b. Russia) (1886 – 1991) Ferde Grofé (1892–1972) Douglas Moore (1893–1969) Walter Piston (1894–1976) Leo Sowerby (1895–1968) William Grant Still (1895–1978) Jaromír Weinberger (1896–1967) Leroy Robertson (1896–1971) Howard Hanson (1896–1981) Roger Sessions (1896–1985) Virgil Thomson (1896–1989) Erich Korngold (1897–1957) Henry Cowell (1897–1965) George Gershwin (1898–1937) Roy Harris (1898–1979) Norman Stephen Richardson (1898 – 1987) George Antheil (1900–1959) Aaron Copland (1900–1990) Reuben Edelstein (1900 – 1998) Anthony Mangino (1901 – 1969) Joseph “Joe” Ingrassia (1901 – 1977) John Cordaro (1902 – 1983) Bernard “Bernie” Chernofsky (1902 – 2006) Max Farber (b. Germany) (1903 – 1999) Marc Blitzstein (1905–1964) Franz Waxman (1906–1967) Ross Lee Finney (1906–1997) David Siegel (1907 – 2009) Leroy Anderson (1908–1975) Elliott Carter (1908–2012) Peter “Pete” Favazza (1909 – 2020) Samuel Barber (1910–1981) William Schuman (1910–1992) Alan Hovhaness (1911–2000) Gian Carlo Menotti (b. Italy) (1911–2007) Don Gillis (1912–1978) John Cage (1912–1992) Morton Gould (1913–1996) Vivian Fine (1913–2000) Norman Dello Joio (1913–2008) Irving Fine (1914–1962) David Diamond (1915–2005) Milton Babbitt (1916–2011) Lou Harrison (1917–2003) Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990) George Rochberg (1918–2005) Harold Shapero (born 1920) Ralph Shapey (1921–2002) Lukas Foss (1922–2009) Peter Mennin (1923–1983) Joseph “Joe” Bonanno (1924 – 2018) Morton Feldman (1926–1987) Earle Brown (1926–2002) Dominick Argento (born 1927) James Cohn (born 1928) Nicolas Flagello (1928–1994) Thea Musgrave (born 1928) George Crumb (born 1929) André Previn (born 1929) Peter Schickele (AKA P.D.Q. Bach) (born 1935) Steve Reich (born 1936) Philip Glass (born 1937) William Bolcom (born 1938) Charles Wuorinen (born 1938) Robert “Bob” Dametto (born 1941) Stanley “Stan” Epstein (born 1943) Jacques LaRue (b. France) (born 1944) John Coolidge Adams (born 1947) Jose Delgado (b. Spain) (born 1949) Michael Rabinowitz (born 1951) John Luther Adams (born 1953) Frank Endrizzi (born 1956) Lionel Bullock (b. England) (born 1961) David Wilson (born 1964) Michael “Mike” Fedorov (born 1964) Lauren Guidotti (born 1972) Notes All invented composers listed here were born in America, unless otherwise noted. Similarly, all other composers listed were born in America, unless otherwise noted, or born in a foreign country not noted since I’m not 100% sure of where they were born.
  15. Introduction This is a list of Russian classical composers, both real and fictional. The fictional ones are intended to become a reality in a separate timeline or in revised history. However, the names of these composers inserted into this list are largely hypothetical. That is, they may or may not be named as such after history is changed. The names of these composers are highlighted in boldface. The purpose of the presence of these composers is to make more compositional geniuses out of the people of Russia. European countries, particularly Italy, Spain, France, Germany, Austria, England, and Russia are to be abundant in genius composers since the Renaissance, and America since the Baroque era. These 8 nations are the nucleus of Western classical music and composition, and thus these are the nationalities I choose to focus on. List Renaissance (c1395-c1600) Vasily Novichkov (1366 – 1443) Ivan Petrov (1368 – 1453) Fyodor Kirdyashkin (1371 – 1446) Boris Shilnikov (1374 – 1456) Grigory Fedechkin (1377 – 1447) Mikhail Furmanov (1382 – 1455) Ivan Dubovsky (1385 – 1460) Anton Kagantsev (1388 – 1464) Yuri Elkonin (1393 – 1467) Vasily Telyatnikov (1395 – 1470) Dmitri Ripinsky (1398 – 1463) Pavel Gerasimov (1402 – 1471) Pyotr Danilovsky (1405 – 1469) Igor Bobrovnikov (1407 – 1458) Aleksandr Fedorischev (1411 – 1497) Aleksey Chevakinsky (1415 – 1485) Ivan Galitskov (1417 – 1478) Vladimir Labazanov (1421 – 1494) Fyodor Rudakov (1425 – 1499) Konstantin Babinov (1427 – 1502) Nikolay Velikovsky (1432 – 1500) Leonid Morozov (1434 – 1506) Yevgeny Dudenkov (1437 – 1510) Mikhail Nizovtsev (1441 – 1505) Roman Anisimov (1443 – 1500) Dmitri Inyutin (1448 – 1513) Pyotr Tolchanov (1450 – 1518) Aleksey Ustilovsky (1454 – 1531) Iosif Govorov (1457 – 1506) Timofey Antonov (1461 – 1527) Nikolay Ratmirov (1464 – 1538) Denis Bugoslavsky (1466 – 1544) Boris Glukhonkov (1470 – 1537) Fyodor Sidorov (1475 – 1548) Dmitri Oradovsky (1478 – 1553) Pyotr Nagovitsyn (1482 – 1569) Ivan Kochalov (1485 – 1563) Mikhail Valyanov (1489 – 1570) Grigory Nikitanov (1491 – 1567) Rodion Kriventsov (1494 – 1573) Aleksandr Delektorsky (1498 – 1568) Gavril Trambovetsky (1502 – 1578) Aleksey Vladimirsky (1504 – 1576) Nikolay Pudovkin (1509 – 1581) Andrey Kozlov (1511 – 1584) Igor Korolev (1514 – 1590) Viktor Florentsev (1518 – 1596) Yuri Marakhtanov (1522 – 1599) Fyodor Aleshkin (1525 – 1588) Yaakov Chernavsky (1529 – 1602) Ivan Fradkov (1532 – 1593) Nikolay Golovachev (1535 – 1600) Grigory Smolensky (1539 – 1606) Mikhail Fabrichnikov (1541 – 1609) Valentin Sobolev (1544 – 1618) Fyodor Panikin (1548 – 1613) Konstantin Bogolyubov (1552 – 1603) Samuil Kolyubakin (1554 – 1626) Yaakov Zabrovsky (1558 – 1646) Mikhail Yablontsev (1561 – 1637) Semyon Bulavkin (1566 – 1601) Baroque (c1600-c1760) Vladimir Ivanov (1569 – 1649) Aleksandr Naglovsky (1572 – 1646) Nikolay Kalatozov (1574 – 1655) Fyodor Pogodin (1577 – 1653) Ivan Ilyanov (1582 – 1660) Aleksandr Feryabnikov (1585 – 1659) Nikolay Labinov (1588 – 1665) Mikhail Kuzovlev (1593 – 1662) Gavril Frolovsky (1595 – 1670) Pyotr Kuritsin (1597 – 1676) Boris Golyashkin (1602 – 1679) Fyodor Ashmarin (1605 – 1683) Ivan Khanzhonkov (1607 – 1687) Pyotr Novikov (1612 – 1682) Mikhail Folimonov (1615 – 1688) Grigory Artamkin (1618 – 1676) Nikolay Dubakov (1623 – 1698) Aleksey Pashetkin (1626 – 1703) Pyotr Kadesnikov (1629 – 1715) Nikolay Diletsky (1630 – 1690) Boris Kapranov (1634 – 1708) Fyodor Nakhimovsky (1637 – 1724) Grigory Makhinov (1641 – 1717) Pavel Ibyatov (1643 – 1712) Ivan Rashnikov (1647 – 1726) Vasily Polikarpovich Titov (1650 – 1715) Fyodor Beletsky (1652 – 1699) Pyotr Ostankov (1658 – 1728) Yaakov Shulepnikov (1661 – 1730) Aleksandr Nikolayev (1665 – 1733) Aleksandr Melnikov (1667 – 1738) Pyotr Tabachkov (1670 – 1747) Vladimir Folomkin (1674 – 1743) Nikolay Volkovsky (1677 – 1749) Boris Fortunatov (1681 – 1758) Gavril Serafimov (1684 – 1753) Anton Balandin (1686 – 1761) Yuri Ostrovsky (1691 – 1764) Stefan Chernyshevsky (1694 – 1769) Grigory Paranin (1699 – 1776) Mikhail Lashkarev (1702 – 1755) Konstantin Novodvorsky (1706 – 1779) Vladimir Lipatkin (1708 – 1774) Classical era (c1730-c1820) Boris Bodnarsky (1714 – 1797) Dmitri Filchevsky (1716 – 1787) Igor Rabdanov (1718 – 1788) Ivan Bogdanov (1721 – 1798) Fyodor Efremichev (1725 – 1801) Grigory Malikov (1728 – 1806) Nikolay Zabolotnov (1732 – 1804) Mikhail Sapozhnikov (1734 – 1800) Mikhail Rozhdestvensky (1737 – 1802) Boris Stroganov (1742 – 1811) Aleksandr Salikhovsky (1744 – 1815) Dmitri Aparin (1747 – 1803) Vladimir Babenchikov (1750 – 1796) Pavel Davlatov (1752 – 1805) Nikolay Olshakov (1756 – 1818) Yevstigney Fomin (1761–1800) Pyotr Kantakuzin (1763 – 1823) Daniil Yakovlev (1766 – 1831) Romantic (c1800-c1910) Vladimir Sapozhnikov (1772 – 1842) Mikhail Nozdrachev (1775 – 1838) Aleksandr Velichinsky (1779 – 1844) Grigory Ligachev (1782 – 1853) Nikolay Silkov (1784 – 1857) Aleksandr Alyabyev (1787–1851) Boris Galishnikov (1791 – 1830) Iosif Robkanov (1794 – 1861) Anton Klimanov (1796 – 1870) Mikhail Florensky (1801 – 1868) Mikhail Glinka (1804–1857) Dmitri Savolsky (1807 – 1848) Nikolay Grablevsky (1810 – 1874) Aleksandr Dargomyzhsky (1813–1869) Aleksandr Ossovsky (1817 – 1889) Ilya Fedorov (1822 – 1890) Boris Semyonov (1825 – 1904) Anton Rubinstein (1829–1894) Aleksandr Borodin (1833–1887) César Cui (1835–1918) Mily Balakirev (1837–1910) Modest Mussorgsky (1839–1881) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840–1893) Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908) Aleksandr Taneyev (1850–1918) Anatoly Lyadov (1855–1914) Sergei Taneyev (1856–1915) Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov (1859–1935) Anton Arensky (1861–1906) Aleksandr Gretchaninov (1864–1956) Aleksandr Glazunov (1865–1936) Sergei Rachmaninov (1873–1943) Modern and Contemporary (c1880-????) Aleksandr Raskazov (1863 – 1939) Aleksandr Skriabin (1872–1915) Sergei Koussevitzky (1874–1951) Reinhold Glière (1875–1956) Grigory Nikushkin (1876 – 1955) Pavel Chesnokov (1877–1944) Konstantin Glinchikov (1878 – 1925) Boris Frolushkin (1879 – 1967) Nikolay Medtner (1880–1951) Nikolay Myaskovsky (1881–1950) Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) Aleksandr Filkov (1886 – 1990) Sergei Prokofiev (1891–1953) Iosif Abalov (1894 – 1970) Maksim Palashkin (1896 – 1989) Ivan Uzakov (1896 – 2000) Aleksandr Tcherepnin (1899–1977) Boris Plavkov (1900 – 1968) Pyotr Bershadensky (1900 – 2001) Andrey Sharogorsky (1901 – 1967) Pavel Berezov (1902 – 2012) Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904–1987) Iosif Palmov (1905 – 1983) Dmitri Shostakovich (1906–1975) Boris Vukolov (1907 – 2009) Pyotr Pliskanovsky (1909 – 1987) Konstantin Davidovsky (1911 – 2006) Yuri Efimov (1916 – 2004) Mikhail Buzyanov (1918 – 2003) Iosif Topyrkin (born 1922) Nikolay Magnitsky (born 1926) Fyodor Gontarev (born 1929) Rodion Shchedrin (born 1932) Alfred Schnittke (1934–1998) Pavel Oblakov (born 1935) Ivan Malevsky (born 1937) Vladimir Kachimov (born 1943) Vadim Bumarskov (born 1945) Ivan Markhanov (born 1948) Boris Novoselov (born 1952) Tomas Antonov (born 1954) Andrey Krylov (born 1961)
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