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More Notes on the ZPE Casmir & Hutchison Effects...


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Somwhere between the context of these two experiments, lays the very

 

foundations of developing the next generation R&D of exploratory

 

methods that will unleash this new power into our world very soon!

 

I welcome your comments, and open to hearing from those who are

 

working on similar projects.

 

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---T12

 

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The Hutchison Effect -- An Explanation

 

by Mark A. Solis

 

http://www.geocities.com/ResearchTriangle/Thinktank/8863/HEffect1.html

 

People often ask, "What exactly is the Hutchison Effect?" This brief essay is an attempt to answer that question to the satisfaction of the majority. First of all, the Hutchison Effect is a collection of phenomena which were discovered accidentally by John Hutchison during attempts to study the longitudinal waves of Tesla back in 1979. In other words, the Hutchison Effect is not simply a singular effect. It is many.

 

The Hutchison Effect occurs as the result of radio wave

 

interferences in a zone of spatial volume encompassed by high voltage sources, usually a Van de Graff generator, and two or more Tesla coils. The effects produced include levitation of heavy objects, fusion of dissimilar materials such as metal and wood (exactlyas portrayed in the movie, "The Philadelphia Experiment"), the anomalous heating of metals without burning adjacent material, spontaneous fracturing of metals (which separate by sliding in a sideways fashion), and both temporary and permanent changes in the crystalline structure and physical properties of metals.

 

The levitation of heavy objects by the Hutchison Effect

 

is not---repeat not---the result of simple electrostatic or

 

electromagnetic levitation. Claims that these forces alone can

 

explain the phenomenon are patently ridiculous, and easily disproved by merely trying to use such methods to duplicate what the Hutchison Effect has achieved, which has been well

 

documented both on film and videotape, and has been witnessed many times by numerous credentialed scientists and engineers. Challengers should note that their apparatus must be limited to the use of 75 Watts of power from a 120 Volt AC outlet, as that is all that is used by Hutchison's apparatus to levitate

 

a 60-pound cannon ball!

 

The fusion of dissimilar materials, which is exceedingly remarkable, indicates clearly that the Hutchison Effect has a powerful influence on Van der Waals forces. In a striking and baffling contradiction, dissimilar substances can simply "come

 

together," yet the individual substances do not dissociate. A block of wood can simply "sink into" a metal bar, yet neither the metal bar nor the block of wood come apart. Also, there is no evidence of displacement, such as would occur if, for example, one were to sink a stone into a bowl of water.

 

The anomalous heating of metal without any evidence of

 

burning or scorching of the adjacent materials (usually wood) is a clear indication that possibly the nature of heat may not be

 

completely understood. This has far-reaching implications for

 

thermodynamics, which hinges entirely on the presumption of such

 

knowledge. It should be noted that the entirety of

 

thermodynamics is represented by the infrared portion of the

 

electromagnetic spectrum, which is insignificant in a context of 0 Hz. to infinite Hz. The anomalous heating exhibited by the Hutchison Effect shows plainly that we have much to learn,

 

especially where thermodynamics and electromagnetism meet.

 

The spontaneous fracturing of metals, as occurs with the Hutchison Effect, is unique for two reasons: (1) there is no evidence of an "external force" causing the fracturing, and (2) the method by which the metal separates involves a sliding motion in a sideways direction, horizontally. The metal simply

 

comes apart.

 

Some temporary changes in the crystalline structure and

 

physical properties of metals are somewhat reminiscent of the "spoon bending" of Uri Geller, except that there is no one near the metal samples when the changes take place. One video shows a spoon flapping up and down like a limp rag in a stiff breeze. In the case of permanent changes, a metal bar will be hard at one end, like steel, and soft at the other end, like powdered lead. Again, this is evidence of strong influence on Van der Waals forces.

 

The radio wave interferences involved in producing these effects are produced from as many as four and five different radio sources, all operating at low power. However, the zone in which the interferences take place is stressed by hundreds of kilovolts. It is surmised by some researchers that what Hutchison

 

has done is tap into the Zero Point Energy. This energy gets its name from the fact that it is evidenced by oscillations at zero degrees Kelvin, where supposedly all activity in an atom ceases. The energy is associated with the spontaneous emission and annihilation of electrons and positrons coming from what is called "the quantum vacuum." The density of the energy contained in the quantum vacuum is estimated by some at ten to the thirteenth Joules per cubic centimeter, which is reportedly sufficient to boil off the Earth's oceans in a matter of moments.

 

Given access to such energies, it is small wonder that

 

the Hutchison Effect produces such bizarre phenomena. At the present time, the phenomena are difficult to reproduce with any regularity. The focus for the future, then, is first to increase the frequency of occurence of the effects, then to achieve some degree of precision in their control. The work is continuing at this time. Before long, we shall see what progress can be made.

 

Shreveport, Louisiana

 

February 16, 1999

 

Copyright © 1999 by Mark A. Solis

 

Engineering emptiness. Even in vacuum, the Casimir force between a microscopic sphere and metal paddle alters the frequency of the paddle's oscillation. Specially designed "gaps" in micromechanical systems could someday be used to modify their behavior. Physicists have spent centuries tailoring materials to meet their needs, but a new experiment attempts to engineer with empty space. Researchers placed a tiny sphere within nanometers of an oscillating plate. A minuscule quantum mechanical attraction between the sphere and plate lowered the frequency of the plate's vibration, and the team varied the frequency by moving the bead. The experiment was the first measurement of the effects of the so-called Casimir force on a mechanical system. The results, appearing in the 19 November print issue of PRL, may lead to microscopic machines that use the force of

 

empty space as one of their components.

 

http://www.sciam.com/1297issue/IMG/1297yam_casimir.gif

 

http://www.sciam.com/1297issue/IMG/1297yam_casmirb.gif

 

At the heart of these experiments is the Casimir effect, a phenomenon from quantum electrodynamics (QED). QED dictates that all space, even empty space, is filled with an infinite number of electromagnetic vibrations. When two uncharged metal surfaces are brought within nanometers of each other, there's a limit on the number of vibrations that can exist between them. The vibrations outside the plates create an inward pressure that pushes the plates together--the Casimir force.

 

Federico Capasso and his team at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ, used the Casimir force to control a tiny mechanical oscillator. They applied an alternating (AC) electric field to an uncharged metallic paddle, which caused it to seesaw at a fixed frequency and amplitude. Using a fine-tipped probe, they then lowered a gold plated sphere 100 µm in diameter toward the surface of the paddle. As the sphere came to within a few hundred nanometers of the surface, the team detected a change in the natural frequency of the paddle. By adjusting the height of the sphere by a few nanometers, they could alter the amplitude and frequency of oscillations.

 

"The importance of this work is clearly in engineering applications," says Umar Mohideen of Columbia University in New York City. The Casimir force could cause micromechanical components to stick together, he explains, and so it is important to understand how it interacts with moving parts like the oscillator. Capasso believes that engineers could use their understanding of the Casimir force to design micromachines where empty space is used as a component. For example, he says, a version of this oscillator could be used as a precise position sensor. "In my opinion," he says, "there are lots of opportunities to engineer these quantum electrodynamic forces."

 

http://focus.aps.org/v8/st25.html

 

<hr size="1" width="80%" color="#000099" align="left">"Everything you know,...is Wrong!

 

soon we shall all discover the truth."

 

http://profiles.yahoo.com/vosstech

 

 

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