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Time travel....as easy as driving down the road.


pamela
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Re: Time travel....as easy as driving down the roa

 

From my experience, time travel does take a lot of "energy", if you measure energy in kilowatts or lumens, or neutons.

You have experience in time travel? Do tell. :D

 

However, this is all relative, as a drop of water when split by fission or condensed by fusion, holds lots of "energy" in the term most people think of what "energy" means.

What reactions are you talking about here? Do you mean chemical or nuclear reactions? Because if you mean chemically combining or splitting H & O, then one of those will be exothermic while the other is endothermic. So it's not accurate to say they both "hold lots of energy": one releases energy while the other requires input of energy to take place. If you mean nuclear reactions, well... If you could overcome the coulomb barrier to fuse H & O (which would take lots of energy), then it'd release energy (though only 0.600 MeV per fusion, which isn't much). Or you could fuse 2 O nuclei and get 16.542 MeV, which is a little better except that the coulomb threshold is really bad at this point. And you said water, not just oxygen, so we must account for H somewhere. Obviously you're not going to fission H, and you're not going to gain energy by splitting O (the fission products would be lower on the BE/A curve than O). So what are you talking about? :D

 

 

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Re: Time travel....as easy as driving down the roa

 

I missed something obvious in my last post.

 

From my experience, time travel does take a lot of "energy", if you measure energy in kilowatts or lumens, or neutons.

I thought you meant "neutrons", as in nuclear power. However, I think you meant "newtons", which is a unit of force, not energy. And lumen is not a unit of energy either. Hmm...

 

 

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Re: Time travel....as easy as driving down the roa

 

to clarify, when referring to a drop of water i was referring to energy that that drop could produce via either fission or fusion. Not electrolysis. Also when referring to measurements of energy I meant Newton, and is a measurement of force. I typed quick and didn't bother to check my work, as I was just trying to make the point that energies from different dimensions have different quantities when all converted into the same units and placed in the same closed system.

 

And yes, I do have experience in TT, but we are not talking about that, I don't want to talk about it, and this is the wrong section to be talking about it.

 

 

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Re: Time travel....as easy as driving down the roa

 

"So. how much energy, in Joules, can a drop of water (~0.5 ml H2O at STP) liberate through fission and through fusion? "

 

? I don't know, i;m not a mathematician. Besides i don't know that you could give an absolute answer to either, as it is unknown how far an atom can be broken down. There is energy to be had at the atomic level, the sub-atomic level, the level beyond that, etc. Same with Fusion, you could eventually combine all the atoms in a drop of water to elements that would be unstable in this time and beyond what scientists have been able to produce for even short instants.

 

 

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>>>> Little Links on Time Travel<<<<

 

Ya!

 

Out the door, down the road, out into Space, and Spacetime. Where am I?

 

Well, I don't know why I am doing this, perhaps - maybe - maybe not, and this is a small list (well it is not half a billion stars of the Infrared Galaxy over there at CalTech).

 

http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/ftp/cats/I/280B/

 

http://seds.lpl.arizona.edu/messier/

 

Stellarium don't separate it enough, I am guessing looking at the program or they don't filter it better as of yet.

 

http://www.stellarium.org/

 

Neither does this one by the looks of it ( and again, John Walker's website and his other program - Homeplanet)

 

http://www.fourmilab.ch/yoursky/

 

But here is another freebie program that wants to use this new star database stuff: (or not - I have not tried this one yet.)

 

http://www.uv.es/jrtorres/CNebulaX.htm

 

But without the Astronomical Almanac from the U.S. Naval Observatory, or better calculation formulas, these program really only generate accurate results for just a few years - say like 1800's to 2100 perhaps, but therein lies the rub of any such programs, going back to the Birth of Christ, just usually is not all that accurate to what was up in the Sky back then (well where it was and really accurate - just probable mostly).

 

http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/~heck/spages.htm

 

Why in France either?

 

Well, I am Lost in Space and Time.

 

http://adc.gsfc.nasa.gov/

 

Fly there in Celestia: (or with the Hayden Planetarium program freebie to download - Digital Universe)

 

http://www.shatters.net/celestia/

 

another one to fly in.

 

I think I will fly away.

 

:)

 

 

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The I/280B catalog of 2.5 million stars is really only a space delimited text file in the end, but the Readme file there explains what the fields are for the 210 character record file. Except a bunch of changing it around to a comma delimited record file in Excel or something (actually with my old programs - Visual Studio. NET comes in handy to read it in afterwards in Excel to make it a *.csv (comma delimited and not space delimited after using the ReadMe file there on the website.....)

 

Starry Eyes!

 

http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/ftp/cats/I/280B/

 

that thing of a database.

 

:)

 

 

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I glanced at a couple of stories but only a couple caught my eye, the rest, well, I guess I have to look at it all again sometime, so perhaps I should add another link to the already overwhelmed list of links I have.

 

I forget now what that story was about, but sometime perhaps I will look better at it.

 

Humans are on this Planet in this Universe.

 

But, the Universe may not be Enough!

 

:)

 

 

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And all this time travel and looking up, don't let a Near Earth Object hit you.

 

http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/neo/

 

Again there has been relatively close ones lately and one (although not big) hit in the Sudan, you may have read about.

 

And time may be the only dimension, or how are you going to go out into SpaceTime anytime in the future?

 

Keep looking up.

 

 

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Update last was on Oct. 20

 

http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/iau/NEO/TheNEOPage.html

 

There are five Near Earth Objects to track and figure out just recently.

 

All sit there on the computer and just sit there.

 

They really do not have the time to track anything if others do not tell them about it in the first place.

 

May you all live in the future.

 

 

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Again there has been relatively close ones lately

The 'closeness' is somewhat deceptive. For example, one might consider 10 times the radius of the Earth, or 40,000 miles, to be 'close. However, using the area formula PI*(R^2).....the circular area in that space is actually 314 times that of the earth.

 

So even an asteroid that passes within 40,000 miles of Earth actually only has about a 1 in 300 chance of hitting Earth.

 

I've heard asteroids as far away as the Moon being described as 'close'.....but there the odds increase to 1 in 11,000. Space is a big place.

 

 

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Time is relative and there is a mental component to time where perception of time can be altered by the mind:

 

http://www.churchtimes.co.uk/content.asp?id=14992

 

quote:

 

"

 

Time does go slow

 

DOES time always march with an inexorable, steady beat? We have all experienced occasions when time appears, if not exactly to stand still, to be excruciatingly elongated: during sermons by particular preachers, or in General Synod.

 

Science might now support the phenomenon, we learned in Time, the first episode of a big-name documentary series presented engagingly by Dr Michio Kaku (BBC4, Sunday), a co-founder of String Field Theory in modern physics.

 

The passing of time is more than an industrial construct, a ploy by capitalist bosses to squeeze the last ounce out of a downtrodden proletariat by means of clocking-on, and time-and-motion stopwatches. Deep within our brains we all have a mechanism that fires cells in a pattern of beats which synchronises our bodies, a biological mechanism that we apparently share with every other terrestrial life-form.

 

But this steady rhythm can be altered: the production of adrenalin in moments of acute stress slows down our body time so that the perception of, say, a serious accident as happening in slow motion is in fact exactly what happens.

 

"

 

 

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Science might now support the phenomenon, we learned in Time, the first episode of a big-name documentary series presented engagingly by Dr Michio Kaku (BBC4, Sunday), a co-founder of String Field Theory in modern physics.

This is one of the problems with sourcing an argument by using pop-sci culture. Michio Kaku is not one of the founders, co-founders or anything else founding-wise of String Theory. String theory came about in 1968 through the work of Gabriele Veneziano, Leonard Susskind and a few other physicists. In 1968 Dr. Kaku was still an undergrad at Harvard.

 

Dr. Kaku is a brilliant physicist and teacher but he has actually only published five papers in academic journals - all between 1992 and 1999, 25 to 30 years after string theory was first introduced.

 

 

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Re: Time travel....as easy as driving down the roa

 

#

 

SPACE.com -- Co-Founder of String Field Theory Explores the ...

 

Oct 30, 2003 ... Renowned physicist, author, and co-founder of 'String Field Theory', Dr Michio Kaku believes that alien civilisations may have learnt to ...

 

www.space.com/entertainment/michio_kaku.html - Cached - Similar

 

#

 

This may be where that reference came from.

 

 

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This is one of the problems with sourcing an argument by using pop-sci culture. Michio Kaku is not one of the founders, co-founders or anything else founding-wise of String Theory.

http://physics.about.com/od/michiokaku/p/michiokakubio.htm

 

quote:

 

"

 

String Field Theory Work:

 

In the realm of physics research, Michio Kaku is best known as the co-founder of string field theory, which is a specific branch of the more general string theory which relies heavily on mathematically framing the theory in terms of fields. Kaku's work was instrumental in showing that the field theory is consistent with known fields, such as Einstein's field equations from general relativity.

 

"

 

 

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Exactly what I said. Sourcing from pop-sci articles is fraught with misinformation. As I said, when string theory was introcuced Kaku was still an undregrad. It was over 20 years later when Kaku published his first paper on string theory. Compare to Leonard Susskind. He's published over 25 major papers on the subject between 1968 and 2009.

 

 

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As I said, when string theory was introcuced Kaku was still an undregrad. It was over 20 years later when Kaku published his first paper on string theory. Compare to Leonard Susskind. He's published over 25 major papers on the subject between 1968 and 2009.

Michio Kaku is a well respected physicist but that is not really the topic of discussion. The topic is the link between the mind and time shifting. There is evidence that time does indeed slow down for the mind during traumatic events. Granny's lift cars off of the grandkids and scared boxers knock out the champ with lightning speed for a devastating upset.

 

 

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Michio Kaku is a well respected physicist but that is not really the topic of discussion.

I didn't introduce his name into the topic. As I recall, that was you.

 

There is evidence that time does indeed slow down for the mind during traumatic events.

There's also very clear, convincing and verifiable evidence that it is common to suffer short-term memory loss, faulty transfer of short-term memory to long-term memory (false recollection) and PTSD from such events.

 

 

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Michio Kaku is a well respected physicist but that is not really the topic of discussion.

I didn't introduce his name into the topic. As I recall, that was you.

 

I quoted from an article that I first saw as a television program that showed a scientific experiment where people actually could read a speeding clock while falling, but they could not read it at rest. Something to do with adrenalin speeding up the brain's synaptic processing. Mental time dilation.

 

There's also very clear, convincing and verifiable evidence that it is common to suffer short-term memory loss, faulty transfer of short-term memory to long-term memory (false recollection) and PTSD from such events.

That is true in many cases but not all.

 

 

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I quoted from an article

 

Which is all you ever seem to do.....rather than directly answer any posts. Any time an issue is raised, your immediate response is to spam a bunch of 'quotes'.

 

This is typical behaviour of someone who really doesn't have a clue about a topic. The inability to debate on par with others is obscured with relentless attempts to appear wise by cutting and pasting whatever can be dug up on the net....even if it has no direct response value to what has been said by others.

 

It's really little more than a subtle form of spam. The person resonsible being incapable of proper rational DEBATE with others.

 

 

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There is evidence that time does indeed slow down for the mind during traumatic events.

See, now there is an area where I can agree with you. Our perception of the passage of time changes as a function of the situations we find ourselves in. I would not say that is time slowing down. It could very well be nothing more than the processing bandwidth of the human mind becoming saturated. In very much the same way, when a real-time control system has too much processing to do within its alloted cycle time, looking at the data of how the system reacts looks very much like time is slowing down... from the perspective of that system.

 

So while I agree this is a phenomenon experienced by the mind, I see no evidence that this impacts cosmic and/or thermodynamic time outside the mind. I am very interested in how the mind perceives time, but I alos avoid trying to mix the perceptions of the human mind with conclusions about extant physics. That can muddy the waters.

 

RMT

 

 

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The experience I had in 1998 on the San Bernardino Freeway near downtown L.A. (which was 10 to 15 seconds before a crash that wrecked the car I was in), was analogous to that of a little switch in my brain being flipped and events of the external world slowing down.

 

Now there's a relative thing involved, here. If my perception of time speeds up (my personal second becomes shorter), the external second--which is the rest of the world--becomes longer, and hence the events of the world seem to slow down.

 

But, along with this, the sense of anxiety disappears. I felt totally objective with no sense of emotion.A dispassionate, external, observer who could some how stretch out the external sequence (subjectively)to make the available time as long as necessary.Rather than being paralyzed by fear, as the common expression goes, the exact opposite was true,I felt no fear or inhibition whatever.You must realize that I knew full well I was in the midst of a potentially fatal accident, but I was completely detached. There is a curious analogy to having one's wind knocked out in a fall--for a few seconds you don't know if you will ever be able to take another breath, but somehow it doesn't matter,and even seems mildly ironic(!)

 

I think I can convey this better by taking a chance with technical inaccuracy: Let's say my brain was temporarily running at a faster processing speed.

 

As Rainman noted, this phenomenon has no effect on actual external time, and I don't believe you can physically move faster.

 

Lynn Dickey, former GB quarterback in referring to his own experiences with this phenomenon, and making reference to Reggie Jackson --a famous slugger of October--said the pitched balls "must have looked like basketballs coming at him."

 

 

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