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A question to any one who may assist in an answer


Michael Janks
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Understandably. Our knowledge of The Universe is pretty primitive and we are only just beginning to explore the outer regions of our own Solar System. I have a question I have been eager to obtain an answer to. Obviously the answer would be speculative as per to my question. As Such an event has never been witnessed. Here goes:

 

I refer to a Sanrio where a binary solar system exists. Both system have their own star and orbiting planets. Should one of the Stars go Supernova and the surviving Solar System is at a safe distance as not to be affected by the collapsing Star. Would it be possible for the outer planets in that Solar System which had collapsed-to take on a new orbit within the surviving System. I.e. detach from the collapsed Star and find an attraction to the remaining system which is yet close enough to draw the planet into the new system and incorporate the planet into the Remaining Solar system. A question probably not too important, but it originated from a theory I have and that is. Would it be a possibility for a star to Orbit a planet PROVIDED that planet is larger than the Star. Any constructive answer would be so appreciated.

 

 

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We are talking speculation here. The star that goes Nova has to explode in order for its planets to exit its gravitational influence. Or the Nova star has to lose a large portion of the material comprising itself. If any of the planets are headed in the direction of the sister binary star, a capture scenario might occur.

 

Your theory is probably more plausible though. Very large low radiative bodies have been observed. Not considered stars. Just need an astronomical observation to confirm whether or not stars will orbit about these large cold bodies.

 

 

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Only if you've had a snapshot of the universe itself, and can rearrange the chess pieces on the playing board.

 

Example, let us posit a world where our star is always in orbit. Now let us use the hypothesis of Atlantis; a star city destroyed out of nowhere, that sunk into the abyss. Because time travel works, Atlantis will rise from the sea again. Maybe not literally, I don't know yet if it existed, but its destruction sounded like an atomic bomb going off! Was that because of us? Was Atlantis the picture to come that we erased with the advent of Oppenheimer? Does destroying an atom create a fault in a star itself? Is nuclear fusion just a way to make our universe less stable? When we dropped a bomb on the planet, did we create a star in still space, that our traveling planet and system then moved away from?

 

Furthermore, I believe I know of the theory you are talking about! At least, I hope I do! Have you heard of a Dyson Sphere? It's like sucking up Sol into a dark vacuum to distribute him evenly, and to make sure he always stays there. Like putting him in a bag to carry around with us. Are you looking to pocket my star? It has already been done!

 

If I were to create a Dyson Sphere, I would contrive a way of using the moon as a giant battery, then using that to power free, clean energy for all. This theory I am hypothesizing you are constructing, could also be described as "yin and yang". How do you part the white and black pupils? A touch of Grey. instead of separating -1 and 1, just make them 0 again.

 

 

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We are talking speculation here. The star that goes Nova has to explode in order for its planets to exit its gravitational influence. Or the Nova star has to lose a large portion of the material comprising itself. If any of the planets are headed in the direction of the sister binary star, a capture scenario might occur.Your theory is probably more plausible though. Very large low radiative bodies have been observed. Not considered stars. Just need an astronomical observation to confirm whether or not stars will orbit about these large cold bodies.

Hi Einstein

 

Thank you for your reply and so appreciate you taking the time to answer

 

Regards

 

Michael

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi Michael nice to see you are still here. I think that nearer to the centre of galaxies where stellar material is packed closer together all sorts of strange twin configurations of bodies will be possible, some we haven't even thought of yet.

 

Polyamorous planets that maybe belong to many stars swinging about all over. Oh my!

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
Hi Michael nice to see you are still here. I think that nearer to the centre of galaxies where stellar material is packed closer together all sorts of strange twin configurations of bodies will be possible, some we haven't even thought of yet.Polyamorous planets that maybe belong to many stars swinging about all over. Oh my!

Hi Vodkafan. Thanks for your reply. I am loving the possibility of all possibilities such as do you think a star (sun) could orbit a planet? providing that planet was bigger than the star? looking so forward to reading your book

 

Regards

 

Michael

 

 

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Well, I read recently of a scenario where two twin suns of roughly equal size close together could happen...then as they would not be exactly the same, the one that expended its nuclear fuel first would collapse into a white dwarf where it would be incredibly dense and massive and the other sun would end up in the orbit of this heavy little dead rock....I think I got that right but it's all theoretical of course.

 

Oh and thanks the book is coming along slowly.

 

 

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Understandably. Our knowledge of The Universe is pretty primitive and we are only just beginning to explore the outer regions of our own Solar System. I have a question I have been eager to obtain an answer to. Obviously the answer would be speculative as per to my question. As Such an event has never been witnessed. Here goes:I refer to a Sanrio where a binary solar system exists. Both system have their own star and orbiting planets. Should one of the Stars go Supernova and the surviving Solar System is at a safe distance as not to be affected by the collapsing Star. Would it be possible for the outer planets in that Solar System which had collapsed-to take on a new orbit within the surviving System. I.e. detach from the collapsed Star and find an attraction to the remaining system which is yet close enough to draw the planet into the new system and incorporate the planet into the Remaining Solar system. A question probably not too important, but it originated from a theory I have and that is. Would it be a possibility for a star to Orbit a planet PROVIDED that planet is larger than the Star. Any constructive answer would be so appreciated.

For the planets orbiting the supernova the event is the end for them. A supernova requires a huge star - at least 5-8 solar masses. They will be entirely consumed by the explosion. The supernova would briefly (a few seconds) output more energy than all the other stars in its galaxy combined over the same period of time. This event is truly cataclysmic. When the "fire" goes out the star collapses with an implosion velocity of about 70k km/sec. When it explodes the particles are ejected at about 20k km/sec. Aside from the ejected matter a huge amount of mass is converted to hard gamma radiation and neutrinos. So the planets get cooked before being disintegrated by the high velocity particles and shockwave. This will be a destructive force for several light years surrounding the supernova.

 

If the planets orbiting the companion managed to survive their orbits would change as mass from the nova is accumulated by the surviving star. Eventually they would spiral in to the survivor because they would be orbiting through a lot of high energy "dust" which would slow their orbital velocity.

 

 

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For the planets orbiting the supernova the event is the end for them. A supernova requires a huge star - at least 5-8 solar masses. They will be entirely consumed by the explosion. The supernova would briefly (a few seconds) output more energy than all the other stars in its galaxy combined over the same period of time. This event is truly cataclysmic. When the "fire" goes out the star collapses with an implosion velocity of about 70k km/sec. When it explodes the particles are ejected at about 20k km/sec. Aside from the ejected matter a huge amount of mass is converted to hard gamma radiation and neutrinos. So the planets get cooked before being disintegrated by the high velocity particles and shockwave. This will be a destructive force for several light years surrounding the supernova.If the planets orbiting the companion managed to survive their orbits would change as mass from the nova is accumulated by the surviving star. Eventually they would spiral in to the survivor because they would be orbiting through a lot of high energy "dust" which would slow their orbital velocity.

I should probably add that given that both stars had approximately the same mass it is very likely that they are at the same place along the path of stellar evolution (they've both left the Main Sequence period of their lives). The companion would also very close to going supernova. The companion will also be accumulating additional mass, a lot of which is heavier elements created and ejected by the original supernova that cannot undergo fusion. The process can poison what little remaining light fusible elements it has available. This can speed up the time until supernova. The surviving planets won't survive for long.

 

Another thing to consider regarding all the orbits: The two stars were initially co-orbiting their common barycenter, a point somewhere about half the distance between them. The supernova star would lose a large portion of its mass, at least half of which is ejected away from the barycenter. At 20k km/sec the mass is leaving at a velocity far greater than the escape velocity - it won't come back (it's also possible that up to 10% of the mass is converted to energy and neutrinos that escapes recapture and leaves at the speed of light). The barycenter will be greatly shifted toward the now much more massive companion. The orbital mechanics of the entire two star system will be significantly altered. The stars are going to move toward each other. The planet's orbits will become unstable.

 

 

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I should probably add that given that both stars had approximately the same mass it is very likely that they are at the same place along the path of stellar evolution (they've both left the Main Sequence period of their lives). The companion would also very close to going supernova. The companion will also be accumulating additional mass, a lot of which is heavier elements created and ejected by the original supernova that cannot undergo fusion. The process can poison what little remaining light fusible elements it has available. This can speed up the time until supernova. The surviving planets won't survive for long.Another thing to consider regarding all the orbits: The two stars were initially co-orbiting their common barycenter, a point somewhere about half the distance between them. The supernova star would lose a large portion of its mass, at least half of which is ejected away from the barycenter. At 20k km/sec the mass is leaving at a velocity far greater than the escape velocity - it won't come back (it's also possible that up to 10% of the mass is converted to energy and neutrinos that escapes recapture and leaves at the speed of light). The barycenter will be greatly shifted toward the now much more massive companion. The orbital mechanics of the entire two star system will be significantly altered. The stars are going to move toward each other. The planet's orbits will become unstable.

Hi Darby

 

Thank you so much for your reply, always great to be able to obtain explanations on such complicated possibilities. Pretty frustrating when NASA scientists themselves reply to my questions with "Unknown" :)

 

 

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Follow-up:

 

Would it be a possibility for a star to Orbit a planet PROVIDED that planet is larger than the Star. Any constructive answer would be so appreciated.

Yes, the star can orbit the planet. Remember the term that I used above, "barycenter". That's the gravitational center between two masses. The planets orbit the star in our solar system. In reality the sun and planets co-0rbit each other...the sun wobbles slightly as a result. The barycenter for each planet is buried deep inside the sun. But if a planet had a mass that was a significant portion of the star's mass they would co-orbit around a point outside the star.

 

Can it happen in the real world is another question. The smallest star-like objects are classed as brown dwarfs. The smallest known mass for a brown dwarf is 1.5% of the sun (OTS-44). But that's a bit over 10 times the total mass of everything else in the Solar System. It would be hard to imagine a rocky planet that size. Of course if it was a gas "planet" it would have sufficient mass to be a brown dwarf. Any more mass and it would be a star.

 

 

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