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Will we ever learn how to use a wormhole?


TomJo
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Will we ever learn how to use a wormhole? Scientists have already agreed that wormholes exist?
Could it be portals not only in space, but also in time? In theory, a spaceship can pass through such portals. However, they are surrounded by intense radiation, which negates the crew's chances of survival.
In addition, the closest similar object is 13 million light-years away, so humans are unlikely to be able to reach it in the foreseeable future.

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https://theconversation.com/wormholes-may-be-lurking-in-the-universe-and-new-studies-are-proposing-ways-of-finding-them-153020

Astronomers think wormholes exist at the centres of very bright galaxies. There are no articles yet describing the detected wormholes. But they have already suggested ways to search. If the theory turns out to be true, what could be the difference in exploring the universe?
(If the nearest wormhole is 13 million light-years away, then ... it is unlikely that anything will change)

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I think there is a good reason why this effect is not used. How do you imagine a rotating ship? How fast does it have to rotate to reach an acceptable speed? Even disregarding what happens to the insides of such a device (equipment, astronauts ...), how much energy does it take to spin the ship?

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If you watched the video you would see it violated the conservation law of angular momentum. The wingnut slows down and reverses its spin direction as it flips its orientation in space. A characteristic identical to the nuclear weak force. One could interpret the observation as being time reversed. Obviously the inertial laws we are taught in school do not apply. As to your additional questions, I'm still new to this phenomena and don't have all the answers. But there is another little toy that displays a similar rotational phenomena while stabilizing the flip in an opposite direction.

 

 

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Thank you for sharing that video Einstein. That really blew me away. I am not a physicist, but my husband wears that hat some days-and we thought that was a very fascinating topic. I have never even heard of an ellipsoid and its movement in space like that before. We have one of those spinner top too and watch it very closely sometimes. It is amazing what happens. Now that makes me curious about how angular momentum might work on Mars too. 

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